Movie premieres: religious terrors, life twilights and prehistoric families

Movie premieres: religious terrors, life twilights and prehistoric families
0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 8 Second


With the holidays just around the corner, our cinemas are getting ready to receive a new assortment of billboard premieres advanced, with which to expand the offer available prior to Christmas Eve. A selection in which there are titles for the smallest of the house such as the sequel to the animated hit Dreamworks ‘The Croods’, feature films for horror lovers by auteur in the purest A24 style, dramas with dazzling casts and other proposals for all types of palates.

‘Saint Maud’ (2019)

In favor: Above all, the film’s spectacular visual treatment, with a dull color palette and impeccable cinematography courtesy of Ben Fordesman. Morfydd Clark, intense and most compelling in her complicated title role. Some successes at the door on stage and when composing disturbing images by the director and screenwriter Rose Glass.

Against: His approach to terror, after such particular and lucid bets as ‘Hereditary’, seems uninspired and original. The film has a somewhat irritating aura of self-congratulation, and it seems to think itself much more intelligent and transcendent than it really is.

‘The father’ (‘The Father’, 2020)

In favor: If putting together Anthony Hopkins and Olivia Colman in the same cast, and accompanying them with luxury secondary players like Imogen Poots or Mark Gattis is not a hallmark of assured quality, few things are. The film comes after garnering praise at festivals such as San Sebastián, and amassing a number of nominations at the British Independent Film Awards.

Against: A priori, little to say against a debut that seems to avoid the undesirable realms of melodrama despite dealing with subjects most prone to it.

‘The Croods: A New Age’ (‘The Croods: A New Age’, 2020)

In favor: The fantastic work of the Dreamworks animation team, combined with vigorous production and the occasional spectacular set piece courtesy of newcomer Joel Crawford. The balance it achieves to try to satisfy the smallest of the house without forgetting the adult audience. Its amazing cast of original voices, with performers like Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone or Ryan Reynolds.

AgainstComparisons are always obnoxious, but this ‘The New Age’ is a lot less fresh and inspired than the original ‘The Croods’.

Plus…

‘Family photo’ (‘Family photo’, 2018)

Cecilia Rouaud writes and directs this palatable French comedy starring Vanessa Paradis and Camille Cottin.

‘I Am Woman’ (2019)

From Australia, Unjoo Moon directs this biographical drama centered on the figure of singer and activist Helen Reddy.

‘Dancing in the mist’ (‘Nematoma’, 2019)

Close the premieres of the week this Lithuanian thriller directed and co-written by Ignas Jonynas.

The recommendations of the Espinof team

Kiko vega: ‘Saint Maud’. Uncomfortable, beautiful and relatively dangerous, Rose Glass’s first film combines with pulse and exquisite taste the Catholic horror of the 70s and the most artistic part of the new underground horror. That ‘Saint Maud’ does not reach 90 minutes takes her away from unnecessary speeches and allows her to play with a spectator who can be shaken at will until leaving him in a situation more similar to that of ‘Red State’ than that of the ‘ Carrie ‘that we all thought when we saw the first poster. A necessary movie for unnecessary Christmas.

If this week’s premieres don’t catch your eye or you want to recover titles that have been on the bill for the longest time, remember that you can take a look at the movies on the bill from last week and the previous one.



Source link

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleppy
Sleppy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Comments

0 comments

Related Post

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *